Learn Some Aussie Slang Before You Visit Australia

Travel

The start of a new year is the perfect time to do something you’ve never tried before like visit other countries and learn about them.  Melbourne, Australia is an awesome place to visit this January especially if you want a warm getaway. It’s Australia’s unofficial capital of cool as you can roam around visiting night markets, bars, outdoor concerts and the famous Melbourne Zoo. It’s a good idea to get an Australian visa application as early as possible and learn some slang while at it for an even better time.

 

Adapting to the Aussie Culture

Getting an Australian visa application and submitting one is actually easier done than said with the help of a migration agent. You could worry less about the requirements because they’ll make sure everything is all sorted out for your stay. What you need to do, however, is to learn how to adjust to life in Australia while waiting for your visa.

You’ll have no trouble getting around there so long as you got a good command of the English language. People in Australia will immediately know you’re a tourist just from the way you talk and may adjust accordingly to give you an easier time understanding what they say. But when they talk first and assume you’re an Aussie, you might get confused at the slang words and phrases you’ll hear from them. Yes fair dinkum, mate!

 

The Aussie Slang

A huge part of adapting to the Australian culture is learning the slang and accent so you’ll be able to pick up everything you hear no problem. Although you don’t actually need to learn all of the slang words, learning the popular ones will do for a short stay unless you plan to move eventually.

Try learning and practicing some of these A-Z  Aussie slang words and phrases to get you started.

 

  • Airy fairy – Vague
  • Aggro – Aggressive or angry
  • Ankle biter – Child
  • Any tick of the clock – Soon
  • Arvo – Afternoon
  • Aussie (Ozzie) – Australian
  • Barbie – Not the doll, but barbecue
  • Bikkie/Biccy – Biscuit
  • Bingle – Vehicle accident
  • Bloke – Man or guy
  • Bluey – A redhead, bluebottle jellyfish or a blue cattle dog
  • Bogan – Unrefined person
  • Boardies – Surfing shorts
  • Bottleo – Liquor shop
  • BYO (Bring Your Own) – Bring your own food or drink (beer)
  • Chewy – Chewing gum
  • Chook – Chicken
  • Digger – Soldier, or formerly a soldier
  • Daks – Pants
  • Esky – Any form of a cooler (Philippines: Coleman)
  • Fair Dinkum – Real, genuine, honest
  • Footy – Football (Australian rules football)
  • G’day – Hello (said even in evenings)
  • Garbo – Garbage collector
  • Hooroo – Goodbye
  • Maccas – McDonald’s
  • Mozzies – Mosquitoes
  • Op shop – Thrift store
  • Pav – Pavlova, a popular Aussie dessert
  • Piker – Someone who pikes (leaves or quits) early
  • Polly – Politician
  • Plonk – Cheap Wine
  • Postie – Postman
  • Rego – Registration
  • Sanger – Sandwich
  • Schooner – Glass of beer
  • Smoko – Cigarette or coffee break
  • Shout – His/her turn to pay (my shout)
  • Servo – Gas station
  • Straya – Australia
  • Sunnies – Sunglasses
  • Thongs – Flip flops or Slippers, not the underwear
  • Tool – An idiot
  • Ute – A utility vehicle
  • Woop woop – A small town
  • Wuss – Coward
  • Yewy – U-turn
  • Yakka – Hard work

 

The Aussie test with Bogart the Explorer is a good YouTube video to watch if you want to try out how many words and phrases you understood.

 

 

Keep Practicing

Learning the slang is easy, but the accent takes some time to learn and some work to perfect so keep practicing. Once your Australian visa application gets approved with flying colors, you may now visit and enjoy the sights, sounds, and culture of Australia while sounding like a true local.

 

You may even improve your slang and accent by talking to Aussies you meet during your stay so just have fun learning and experiencing everything. Before you know it, you’ve already adapted well with their culture. Just a reminder: if you plan to visit this 2019, have your visa sorted out early and learn a bit of the Australian culture so you’ll have a better travelling experience. Happy New Year!

 

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